chess openings

Chess Openings

Tag and you will discover!
Funky name, real hobbies
[ Sign up | Log in | Guest ] (beta)
ccmcacollister 224 ( +1 | -1 )
GM Boris Spassky , fmr WC of Chess GM Boris Spassky is a former World Champion (of FIDE, but back when there was only a FIDE WC) and another of those GM's who have really impressed me with their play, conduct at the board, and general demeanor as a genuinely classy human being. Not to say I've met the man, but speaking of his public image which has always seemed to be exemplary. (Granted some antics occurred on both sides during the first WC match with Fischer. But I tend to attribute most on the Soviet side to that nations politico's aor federation, tho its just my opinion. Who can really say about all of what transpired during that topsy-turvy, reality bending event ?!? :)
*****
He is reputed to be a great gentleman at the board; and is certainly one of the Great players of all-time, in my book. One who, it seems to me, does not often receive the degree of recognition for strength of play that is deserved. Perhaps due to the fact and nature of his WC loss to RJF, and having subsequently gained something of a reputation for contentedness to draw ascribed to his tournament play in later years.
In his play, I consider him to be one of the great generalists. Those players who exhibit a profound grasp of all aspects of the game, and having a very objective style that can bend to meet whatever type of position is at hand and handle it well. Much like Fischer, actually. Yet Spassky can attack with the best of the tacticians as well, as some of the games I plan (hope) to present here will clearly demonstrate. And to that point, here is the first link to one of them ... Spassky-Evans 1962 in which Boris trails by several pawns but brings home the point with his fantastic activity, in pursuit of his rival's King.
************************************
-> www.chessgames.com
********************************************
As usual, I'd welcome and indeed request you to add any comments, annecdotes, games, annotations, opinions, or any other matter you would care to. Please do. [I'll only talk to myself for so long ... before getting bored with the Forums again!]
* * *
{I'd like to say Thanks to mlazar for the many interesting & insightful comments and discussions we've had via PM. Wish you were posting, Mike! }
* * *
Regards, Craig A.C.
}8-)


ccmcacollister 30 ( +1 | -1 )
B.Spassky as defender . . . Here is a game where he defends the BL side of a Ruy Lopez, gaining material during defense to bring home the point after snuffing the attack of WT.
RUY LOPEZ / Smyslov Variation
***
-> www.chessgames.com
ccmcacollister 117 ( +1 | -1 )
A brilliancy with Bronstein Spassky the attacker ... King's Gambit Accepted / Abbazia Defense ( this name of this variation is not one I've ever heard before. There's always Something more to learn in Chess!) from 1960 ... ECO codes C33-39
******

-> www.chessgames.com
*****
And a Sicilian Defense, Scheveningen Variation; Fischer-Spassky 1972 from the WC match, and one of the featured games in RJF's '60 Memorable...'
This game struck me the first time I saw it for the ease by which WC Spassky navigated the opening and invested a pawn to turn the game from one where WT would entertain hopes of his K-side space advantage being turned to attack upon BL's King, into one where BL is the one hunting his opponent's King; after switching from his Q-side theme to play with great pressure and energy upon the K-side instead. To be able to switch the field of attack thusly is often a useful and decisive ability found in those with mastery in the game of Chess.
***
-> www.chessgames.com
***
}8-)
gloomy_den 54 ( +1 | -1 )
Spassky never remembered his games. Here is the story that I heard from Ukranian GM Savon, who unfortunately passed away in the June 2005:
In the Soviet Union there was a tradition - grandmasters analysed games of young chessplayers to decide, if one deserves master title. And one grandmaster showed to Spassky some games and asked him to estimate skills of the player. Spassky didn't hesitate and said that it is too early for this player to become master. He didn't remember that it was his own games, the worst ones, specially selected for this event.
daverundle 56 ( +1 | -1 )
a friend of mine was involved in a school trip to Russia many years ago now and one of the highlights was a visit to the Moscow chess club where among others they met Spassky and were involved in simul with him.

He said he was impressed with the way these superstars of chess at the time conducted themselves and by how keen they were to talk to, demonstrate and discuss with him and the children any aspects of chess.

He would confirm i am sure ccmcacollister your impression of one of the great Russian GM of all time in my opinion, I have never forgiven my friend for actually meeting the man!
More: Chess
odonata 74 ( +1 | -1 )
The chessclub where I play is named after Boris Spassky. The founder of our club housed Boris when he arrived in the 1950's for the junior world championship at Antwerp (Belgium, Europe). They remained friends afterwards. This year my club is 50 years old and Boris has promised to visit us. (Boris lives now in Paris, France and has the french nationality). I hope I can play him, it would be the day of my life!
Our club has a website (I'm the webmaster), when the event occurs I'll place pictures on it.
-> www.users.skynet.be
And yes I can confirm from what I heard that he's not only a great player, but a great person too, he's a true gentleman, not at all a bulldog like Kasparov.
ionadowman 80 ( +1 | -1 )
Boris Spassky... ...was a popular world champion. I recall following his 1969 match with Tigran Petrosian, hoping he would take it out. I've always regretted the Reykjavik match. To this day I remain convinced that after Fischer had defaulted Game 2, Spassky had mentally packed his bags and gone home. It would be extremely difficult to do otherwise - the match looked a goner for all money! The best game of the match, though, was game 13 - a rollercoaster of a game that Spassky was maybe unlucky to lose. After such a heavy defeat, Spassky's performance in the subsequent (1973) USSR Championship must have given the Russian Chess Federation pause: Spassky took it out, a clear winner!
I've seen Spassky in action, in Wellington, 1988, but never got to speak with him...
Ion